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Danny Pearce murder: Man who stabbed young father to death over Rolex watch in Greenwich jailed for 35 years 

Evening Standard
A man who stabbed a young father to death for his Rolex watch after he left a jazz club in Greenwich has been sentenced to life imprisonment. Police said the attackers, including Jordan Bailey-Mascoll, 26, showed "no pity" to 31 year-old Danny Pearce as he was chased, stabbed repeatedly and shot at in front of his friends and partner on July 15 2017. Bailey-Mascoll of Dartford, Kent, who had previously been found guilty of murder, was told he will have to serve at least 35 years as he was sentenced at Woolwich Crown Court. Scotland Yard said that Bailey-Mascoll was also sentenced to 18 years in prison to run concurrently after pleading guilty to a robbery on July 13 2017. Mr Pearce, who has a five-year-old daughter, was among the group who were walking to a parked car when he was confronted by Bailey-Mascoll and another man, both on a moped, who demanded he hand over his Rolex watch. Danny Pearce, 31, was killed in July last year He refused and fled to a nearby house to seek help but was cornered by his attackers and died despite efforts of paramedics and police to save him. Footage shown in court showed Bailey-Mascoll and his accomplice picking out their target. The pillion passenger is seen raising his arm to point back at Mr Pearce, clearly alerting his accomplice they have found a potential victim, according to Scotland Yard. Moments after he refused to surrender his Rolex, Bailey-Mascoll produced a large knife and began chasing Mr Pearce while the second man shot in his direction. A post-mortem examination gave the cause of death as multiple stabbings but police also found gunshot grazing and evidence of at least four shots fired in Mr Pearce's direction as he tried to flee. His mother Jan Pearce, 63, in a statement released after sentencing, said: "Danny was randomly murdered in Greenwich. "He left behind a family who loved him unconditionally, including two sisters and a brother. But it is not only us as adults suffering - Danny's nieces and nephews are grieving and it hurts them in different ways. How do you answer a child when they ask where Uncle Danny is? "We need to get these murderers off the street - who knows who will be next and then another family will go through the same devastation as us. "I don't want another mum to go through this agony. I need to know those responsible will be locked up for a very long time." After sentencing Detective Inspector Jo Sidaway said: "The level of violence used against Danny was truly horrendous and the length of time over which they carried out the attack - up to two minutes - marks it out as the most sustained random stabbing attack I've seen in my 26 years in the police service. CCTV showing motorcycle robbers driving past Danny Pearce and pointing him out as a potential target. () "Danny had sought help at a nearby address, but he was cornered and shown no pity. Danny was repeatedly stabbed as he lay collapsed on the steps of a stranger's house. "It was only when his girlfriend shouted out that she'd give them Danny's watch, that they stopped their remorseless attack. Without a hint of compassion they grabbed the Rolex and fled the scene. "The family who lived at the address opened the door to a dying young man, the trauma of that night cannot be imagined. Some witnesses who ran from the scene thought it was a terrorist attack, due to its ferocity. "It is sickening that such prolonged, lethal violence against a defenceless man, with a family, was done only for a wristwatch. "Although one man has been convicted, we are still keen to trace the stolen watch. The model was a Silver Rolex Datejust 2 2017, worth around £5,000." Detectives said the watch was still "an important part" of this ongoing investigation. Ms Sidaway said: "Do you work in a shop perhaps and remember seeing such an item offered for sale? Or maybe you bought such a watch in good faith from an internet dealer? It is an important part of this investigation, which remains ongoing." Scotland Yard said that a 21-year-old man who was also arrested in connection with Mr Pearce's murder remains released under investigation.... read more
 
20. heinäkuuta 2018 1:56:00 Categories: Evening Standard

Mysterious Egyptian sarcophagus opened to reveal three mummies despite fears over ancient curse 

Evening Standard
A mysterious 2000-year-old sarcophagus found in Egypt has been opened - to reveal the mummies of what appeared to be a family of three. The massive black granite relic was unearthed earlier this month during the construction of an apartment building in the historic Mediterranean port city Alexandria. The tomb is the largest yet found in the city, prompting a swirl of theories in local and international media that it might be the resting place of Alexander the Great. But Egyptian archaeologists on Thursday dashed local hopes that it might contain the remains of the ancient Greek ruler - who in 331 BC founded the city that still bears his name - as the 30-tonne sarcophagus was found to contain three decomposed skeletons submerged in red sewage water. There were also fears among Egyptian media that opening the coffin could unleash a 1,000-year curse. The skeletons were found submerged in sewage water (EPA) "We found the bones of three people, in what looks like a family burial," Mostafa Waziri, the head of Egypt's Supreme Council for Antiquities, told reporters at the site. "Unfortunately the mummies inside were not in the best condition and only the bones remain." Waziri said some of the remains had disintegrated because sewage water from a nearby building had leaked into the sarcophagus through a small crack in one of the sides. The giant black sarcophagus was discovered in Alexandria earlier this month (REUTERS) Addressing media speculation that opening the coffin could trigger an ancient curse, Waziri said he was not aware of any such malediction. "The sarcophagus has been opened, but we have not been hit by a curse," Waziri said, according to The Guardian. He added: "We've opened it and, thank God, the world has not fallen into darkness. "I was the first to put my whole head inside the sarcophagus... and here I stand before you ... I am fine." Read more Londoners reveal most bizarre conversations they've heard on the Tube The location of the remains of Alexander the Great, who died in 323 BC in Babylon, remains a mystery. The sarcophagus in Alexandria is the latest of a series of interesting archaeological finds this year in Egypt that include a 4,400-year-old tomb in Giza and an ancient necropolis in Minya, south of Cairo. The unmarked tomb in Alexandria did not likely belong to any other notable ruler in the Ptolemaic period (332 BC-30 BC) associated with Alexander the Great, or the subsequent Roman era, Waziri said. The skulls of the three mummies found inside will now be analysed to determine their ages and cause of death. Additional reporting by Associated Press.... read more
 
20. heinäkuuta 2018 1:28:00 Categories: Evening Standard

Rookie firefighter still on probation during Grenfell Tower disaster tells how he rescued mother and child from blaze 

Evening Standard
A firefighter who was still on probation at the time of the Grenfell Tower disaster has told how he rescued a young girl from the blaze. Harry Bettinson strapped an oxygen mask to the little girl, thought to be four or five years old, and carried her down nine floors to safety. He said he could see what looked like "fireballs and flaming arrows" raining down outside, and became aware they were "running out of time". Mr Bettinson was giving evidence at the public inquiry into the 2017 disaster that killed 72. The firefighter described how he waited inside a ninth floor flat with the girl and her mother while colleagues went to fetch extra breathing equipment, as conditions in the lobby were too treacherous to leave without. He then fitted a face mask on the little girl, linked it up to his oxygen supply, and hugged her tightly to his chest as he descended the narrow stairwell. In a written statement to the inquiry, Mr Bettinson said: "We put one of the new sets on the mum so she was wearing it on her back. "Then got a spare mask set out and I hooked this up to my spare hose so the little girl would be breathing my air. "She didn't fuss once, even when the mask was put over her. "I was really taken by how calm they both were throughout." The Paddington firefighter and his colleagues left the flat and guided the pair through the thick smoke down the "pure black" stairwell. Mr Bettinson said they were trying to protect the mother from firefighters wearing extended breathing equipment in case they barged her as they went in the opposite direction. He continued: "I was also having to be as careful as I was carrying the little girl, I was holding her tight to my chest. She never once made a fuss. "At one point I grew concerned as I didn't know if she was breathing she was so still and quiet. "I shouted at her to open her eyes and she did so I knew she was still OK." After making it outside safely, Mr Bettinson began helping to bring casualties out of the building, estimating he saw more than a dozen bodies that night. The Grenfell fire was only the second high-rise blaze he had attended, he said. Thanking Mr Bettinson after his evidence, inquiry chairman Sir Martin Moore-Bick said: "If I may say so, I think you played a very important part in the fire brigade's response and did extraordinarily well." Additional reporting by Press Association.... read more
 
20. heinäkuuta 2018 0:23:00 Categories: Evening Standard

Outrage as Lambeth Country Show erects new perimeter fence directly in front of memorial benches 

Evening Standard
Residents have been left outraged after a new perimeter fence for the Lambeth Country Show was erected directly in front of memorial benches. The popular fair in Brockwell Park, Brixton, will be surrounded by a two-metre-high metal wall for the first time ever this weekend following concerns from authorities. Dr Karen McCarthy Woolf, a poet and visiting lecturer at Royal Holloway University, described the "nasty shock" at seeing a commemorative bench for her baby son blocked off. "It's a meeting place for friends and family, throughout the year and at the Lambeth Country Show," she said. "I know other families with memorial benches are upset by it too. "Is there really a need for extra security at an event where the Rescue Dog Display Show and Vegetable Carving Competition are highlight attractions?" She added: "The ideal solution is to take the fence down and keep the Country Show as it has been for the past 40 years: peaceful, family friendly, fun and accessible to all." These are memorial benches, the metal barrier could easily have been sited behind them. There are often flowers on these benches, very insensitive, perhaps @lblcountryshow could have the barrier moved 4 feet, tomorrow, let's see, @JimDicksLambeth@MaryAtkLabour@SoniaWinifredpic.twitter.com/tJiMyx3ocX - richard (@richardwillq) July 17, 2018 Lambeth Council said the fence line has been designed to protect the benches by including them inside the fair area, rather than risk people climbing them in order to get in. But many local residents have argued that the positioning of the fence is "insensitive" and called for it be moved before the fair begins on Saturday. Utter stupidity that Lambeth Country Show has its own Berlin wall this year. A community festival that has occurred for decades is now more like a prison camp. #teardownthewall@MayorLBLambeth@SoniaWinifred@brixtonbuzz@BrockwellLove@BrixtonBlog#mayoroflambethpic.twitter.com/6ZUztuWjnc - Robert Park (@intrivia) July 19, 2018 Mollie Rowan tweeted: "Absolutely the opposite of what the fair, the park, or your beautiful bench should be about." Jemima Gibbons added: "I could write a book if not a thesis on the no of times "safety and security" are cited for doing (or stopping) something in a community that no-one actually wants done (or stopped)." The Herne Hill Green party described the fence as "awful profiteering" and encouraged people to complain to Lambeth Council. A council spokesperson told the Standard: "Ensuring public safety is a crucial element planning any event in London, and the Lambeth Country Show is no exception. "The decision to erect a perimeter fence and have searches on entry was taken after assessments from last year and specific advice from members of the borough's Safety Advisory Group which include the Metropolitan Police, London Ambulance and London Fire Brigade. The Lambeth Country Show is set to attract around 150,000 people over the weekend (Georgia Merton) "Further, the Council's insurer has requested these additional measures in order to insure the event. The current national terrorism threat level has also had to be taken into account." They added: "The new safety measures should not impact on people's enjoyment of the Country Show and its family friendly ethos." The Lambeth Country Show is set to attract up to 150,000 people from Brixton and across London over the weekend. It will feature live music, food stalls and a range of traditional countryside pursuits.... read more
 
20. heinäkuuta 2018 0:05:28 Categories: Evening Standard

Japanese company to create 'world's first artificial meteor shower by 2020' 

Evening Standard
A Japanese company developing "shooting stars on demand" has said it will create the world's first artificial meteor shower in 2020. Tokyo-based start-up ALE said it is in the final stages of developing two micro-satellites - each programmed to release 400 tiny balls that glow brightly as they enter the atmosphere, simulating a meteor shower. The first satellite will be jetted into space on a rocket being launched by the nation's space agency by March 2019, according to Agence France-Presse. The second will be launched in mid-2019 on a private-sector rocket. ALE's two satellites will start orbiting the Earth by February 2020, with the world's first delivery of artificial shooting stars set for spring 2020 over Hiroshima. Read more Moment Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin rocket blasts off "We are targeting the whole world, as our stockpile of shooting stars will be in space and can be delivered across the world," ALE chief executive Lena Okajima told reporters on Wednesday. The 400 balls will be enough for 20-30 events and the satellites will be able to stay in space for around two years, the company said. Each star is expected to shine for several seconds before being completely burned up - well before they fall low enough to pose any danger to anything on Earth. They would glow brightly enough to be seen even over the light-polluted metropolis of Tokyo. If all goes well, and the skies are clear, the 2020 event could be visible to millions of people, ALE said. Okajima said the company chose Hiroshima for its first display because of its good weather, landscape and cultural assets. ALE is working in collaboration with scientists and engineers at universities in Japan as well as local government officials and corporate sponsors. The firm is said to be spending around $20 million on the development, production, launch and operation of the two satellites.... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 23:19:00 Categories: Evening Standard

Bethnal Green stabbing: 16-year-old boy knifed in neck and torso on busy high street 

Evening Standard
A 16-year-old boy has been rushed to hospital after being stabbed in the neck on a busy high street in east London. Police were called to Bethnal Green Road at 3.50pm on Thursday following reports of a stabbing. A teenager was found near the junction with Chilton Street, suffering from wounds to his neck and torso. An air ambulance and paramedics were dispatched to the scene and the wounded boy was taken to an east London hospital. The Met Police said they were waiting for an update on his condition. A spokesperson said: "Police were called by London Ambulance (LAS) Service at 15:50hrs on Thursday, 19 July to reports of a stabbing on Bethnal Green Road. "Officers, LAS and London's Air Ambulance attended the scene. "A 16-year-old male was suffering from stab wounds to his neck and torso. He has been taken to an east London hospital - we await an update on his condition." No arrests have been made in connection with the stabbing.... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 22:55:37 Categories: Evening Standard

Birmingham car-jacking: Major police hunt as car-jackers make off with Audi with four-week old baby in the back 

Evening Standard
A four-week-old baby girl was in the back of an Audi which has been carjacked, police said. A major search operation has been launched after the incident in the Acocks Green area of Birmingham this afternoon. A West Midlands Police spokesman said: "Dozens of officers are currently responding to a car-jacking in Acocks Green where a 4-week-old baby girl was still in a car seat in the back. "We are urgently looking for a grey Audi A3 S line with the reg no. BJ66 YLV in connection with the car-jacking from Marie Drive in Acocks Green just after 4pm." The force said the car is believed to have travelled towards Solihull, and asked anyone with niformation to contact them on 101. A spokesman added: "We would also ask you to look out for the child in case the offenders have realised what they have on board and abandoned her. Our priority is the baby's safe return. Call 101."... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 22:39:52 Categories: Evening Standard

Dramatic moment terror plotter who planned to behead Theresa May is dragged to the ground by undercover police during arrest 

Evening Standard
This dramatic aerial footage shows the moment undercover police surrounded and arrested an Islamic State terrorist who plotted to behead Prime Minister Theresa May. Naa'imur Rahman, 20, could be facing life in prison after he planned to blast his way into Downing Street, kill guards and then storm Number 10 armed with a suicide bomb, a gun and knives. But his plot was foiled following an undercover investigation by the Metropolitan Police, MI5 and the FBI. Drone footage today released by Scotland Yard shows Rahman being arrested by counter terror officers after collecting what he thought was an explosives-packed jacket and rucksack on November 28, 2017. Police images also show Rahman's possessions lined with replica improvised explosive devices and a replica bomb intended to be used in the attack. Convicted: Naa'imur Rahman was found guilty of preparing acts of terrorism in Britain Following an Old Bailey trial, Rahman, from Finchley, north London, was found guilty of preparing acts of terrorism in Britain. As part of his attack Rahman had sought to detonate a bomb near to Downing Street before using the ensuing chaos to gain access to Number 10. Rahman, originally from Birmingham, plotted his attack over the course of two years after his extremist uncle was killed in a drone strike while fighting for IS in Syria. However he was snared by a network of undercover counter-terrorism officers. Rahman plotted to storm Downing Street and kill the PM (AFP/Getty Images) Unbeknown to Rahman, as he was putting his plans together he was confiding online with role-players from the Met Police, MI5 and the FBI who introduced him to officers from the Met's Counter Terrorism Command. Rahman met with these officers on a number of occasions as he sought to obtain explosives for the attack. Following his uncle's death, Rahman turned to the internet for help in his attack plans. Rahman handed his jacket to undercover counter terror police to be fitted out with explosives He made contact with an FBI agent posing as an IS official online, who introduced him to an MI5 role-player. By early November last year, he appeared settled on an attack on 10 Downing Street with a suicide bomb, gun or knife. He told an undercover officer: "(God willing) will be very big if I'm successful. I can't mess up. I can't get (martyrdom) if I get caught." Rahman is facing life in jail following an Old Bailey trial (PA) On November 18 last year, Rahman carried out reconnaissance around Whitehall, CCTV footage showed. Two days later, he bought a rucksack from Argos before meeting an undercover officer in Brixton for it to be fitted with explosives. On November 28 last year, the officer handed back Rahman's rucksack and coat, now packed with dummy explosives, and replica pepper spray. FBI agents posing as IS officials introduced Rahman to counter terror role-players as he sought to obtain explosives Rahman told the officer he was "good to go" but was arrested as he walked away carrying the fake bomb, in Kensington. Images released by the Met show Rahman's rucksack with a replica bomb intended to be used as a bomb in a bag, and his jacket fitted with replica improvised explosive devices. Met Police deputy assistant commissioner Dean Haydon said: "Rahman is an extremely dangerous and determined individual. The plotter also handed his rucksack to an undercover officer to be fitted with a bomb "Rahman's target was the Prime Minister but he had no qualms about killing innocent bystanders in the process of reaching her. "In fact, at one point he told a covert counter terrorism officer that even if he could not reach the Prime Minister, he just wanted to strike fear into people." Rahman came to the attention of police in July last year when he complained he was being blackmailed, but failed to attend an appointment. A replica bomb an undercover officer handed to Rahman before he was arrested In August last year he was arrested on suspicion of sending indecent images to underage girls, but never charged. An examination of his mobile phone raised concern he may be harbouring extremist views. Read more Isis terrorist planned to behead PM in 'full frontal' suicide attack DAC Haydon continued: "Every day the counter terrorism network employs a plethora of tactics to investigate terrorism and keep the public safe from terrorists. "Covert policing is a crucial tactic and in this case, it enabled us to understand fully what Rahman intended to do and how serious he was about doing it. "Covert officers were able to gather the strong evidence for the prosecution, and it follows that the jury have found Raham guilty. "This case is a reminder of the continuing threat from terrorism and the need for us to all be vigilant and report any suspicious behaviour." Rahman is due to be sentenced on August 31. Additional reporting by Press Association.... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 22:32:43 Categories: Evening Standard

Poundworld to close ALL of its 335 UK stores as high street's problems continue 

Evening Standard
Poundworld will disappear from the high street next month after its administrators announced the chain's final set of store closures. Deloitte has said all of Poundworld's stores will likely close by August 10, affecting 2,339 staff. The budget retailer is also understood to be closing its warehouse and distribution network, alongside its head office in Normanton, West Yorkshire, leading to the loss of 300 jobs. Administrators have announced the closure of 145 Poundworld stores already. Poundworld fell into administration on June 11, putting more than 5,100 jobs at risk across its 335-store portfolio. Deloitte has been announcing tranches of store closures over the past two weeks after failing to find a buyer for the whole business. Clare Boardman, joint administrator at Deloitte, said: "We would like to thank all the employees for their continued support and commitment during this difficult time. We are keeping staff appraised of developments as they happen." The administrators are still in talks with some interested parties about selling parts of the remaining business, but hopes of saving a significant number of jobs have faded. Deloitte has turned down a bid from company founder Chris Edwards, who was looking to save a raft of stores and safeguard around 3,000 jobs. The founder of rival Poundland, Steven Smith, has also been linked to a bid to salvage part of Poundworld out of administration. The collapse came amid decreasing footfall, rising costs and weak consumer confidence. The budget retail chain, formerly owned by TPG Capital, is one of a number of retailers to call in administrators this year, with Toys R Us and Maplin disappearing from UK high streets. The Gaucho restaurant group also fell into administration on Thursday, with the Cau chain being closed immediately, leading to the loss of 540 jobs.... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 22:25:00 Categories: Evening Standard

University students scrub Rudyard Kipling's 'racist' poem off wall 

Evening Standard
Students at Manchester University scrubbed a poem by Rudyard Kipling off a wall, claiming that the poet was a "racist." ... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 22:22:00 Categories: Evening Standard

'Racist' poem wiped from wall 

Evening Standard
Students at Manchester University scrubbed a poem by Rudyard Kipling off a wall, claiming that the poet was a "racist." ... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 22:22:00 Categories: Evening Standard

The Phoenicia, Beirut - hotel review 

Evening Standard
Located in the heart of the city, Phoenicia is one of Beirut's most glamorous luxury hotels. Built in 1961, it was the original party pad and hosted the A-list elite from Marlon Brando to Bridget Bardot. The hotel closed for twenty years, and after an extensive refurbishment, reopened in March 2000. Now on glistening form, Phoenicia has 446 rooms and suites, a huge spa and picturesque outdoor pool that overlooks the azure blue Mediterranean Sea. Where is it Perfectly positioned in Minet El Hosn, the hotel is sandwiched between the glitzy high-rise buildings of downtown Beirut and the magnificent yacht strewn harbour at Zaitunay Bay. Without traffic, Beirut-Rafic Hariri International Airport is only 30 minutes away, although this can vary greatly at different times of the day. The yacht strewn harbour at Zaitunay Bay Style This is a massive five star luxury hotel, so think big. Large spaces dominate the ground floor with a dramatic lobby and bar, restaurant and outdoor area. It's all decked out in muted pastel colours, with plenty of lux textures and fabrics throughout. Read more Beirut: where to stay, eat, drink & shop The design is minimalist, with a hint of arabesque. It feels very bright and breezy, the perfect tonic to Lebanon's bustling capital. Facilities The hotel boasts a stunning courtyard on the ground floor where guests can enjoy lounging around the Versace-styled, mosaic tiled swimming pool, surrounded by cool cabanas, a massive marble fountain and a killer cocktail bar. Below ground they have an impressive spa, with an indoor swimming pool, fully equipped gym that's open 24 hours, sauna, steam room and treatment rooms. The pool at The Phoenicia Extra curricular Shop till you drop at nearby Beirut Souks; forget haggling for a dusty ornament, this is the Paris of the East, darling, so think big brands like Christian Louboutin and Gucci, as well as independent couture and streetwear. The nights are long in Beirut and nothing starts early, so you are perfectly positioned to have a bite to eat from one of the many restaurants in Mar Mikhael, grab a cab for a few drinks in the boho neighbourhood of Hamra and then head back to the hotel for a costume change before you dance the night away at Gärten, the coolest open air club in town. Lebanon is not a big place, so if the heat of the city catches up with you, why not head to the rolling hills of Bsharri? Only a few hours from the city, enjoy a blissed out meal at Beit Douma, a fabulously restored country house that hosts extravagant weekend feasts prepared by the best local cooks. Food and drink The hotel caters for an international crowd and you can enjoy a breakfast, lunch or dinner buffet at the main restaurant, Mosaic. Breakfasts include everything from a winning cheese station, to an egg counter, pizza oven and salad bar. From sushi to shawarma, lunch and dinner has just as much choice. Trust me when I say that you won't go hungry. Indian mixologist, Olsen Pereira, makes a mighty fine Botanical Garden Spritz in the swanky Cascade Bar - and if you want your own Tom Cruise moment, join his cocktail master classes every Wednesday from 7-8pm. To book, sign up at reception. Next to the picture perfect pool, Amethyste is ideal for a lazy lunch with a beer, and if you fancy something more sophisticated, then head to Eau de Vin on the weekend for an unforgettable fine dining experience. One of the Ambassador Suites Which room There are twelve different types of room and suite, ranging from Club Intercontinental Rooms to the plush Presidential Suite. Our Premium Sea view room came with panoramic views over the harbour, massive bed, sitting area with desk and sofa and an opulent marble bathroom. Best for City slickers enjoying a weekend break in Beirut who want a gorgeous crash pad right in the thick of it. Price Phoenicia , Club Intercontinental Rooms start from $340 + 11% VAT a night (current exchange rate £281) and Premium Sea view start from $500 + 11% VAT a night (current exchange rate £413), +961-1-369 100; phoeniciabeirut.com... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 22:21:56 Categories: Evening Standard

London Zoo staff save premature penguin chick.... after parents stand on its shell 

Evening Standard
London Zoo staff saved a tiny baby penguin named Rainbow after its parents accidentally cracked its egg by standing on it before it hatched. Zookeepers sprang into action to help the chick after they realised what happened, removing parts of the shell carefully with tweezers before moving the chick to an incubation room. Penguin keeper Suzi Hyde said: "We were overjoyed when she started begging for food by opening her mouth wide and making tiny squawks. It was the first sign that she might just make it." Rainbow spent the next few weeks recovering and cuddled up to a toy penguin under the warm glow of a heat lamp, while being hand-fed three times a day. The keepers fed Rainbow a 'penguin milkshake', which was a diet of blended fish, vitamins and minerals. Suzi said: "Rainbow's bodyweight has steadily increased by around 20 percent every day, so she's growing extremely quickly." Read more London Zoo chief's 100 year plan to help save dying species The one-month-old chick is expected to stay in the incubation room until she reaches 10 weeks, by which time she should have grown from 73g at hatch to around 3kg in weight. Suzi added: "Penguins do accidentally step on their eggs, which - even if the chick survives - invariably leads to them rejecting the infant." So it was thanks to keepers' care and the chick's resilience that it was able to survive. It is expected Rainbow will move to the zoo's penguin nursery for swimming lessons, before joining the 80 other penguins in the zoo.... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 21:55:30 Categories: Evening Standard

Sadiq Khan backs London boroughs to make World Car Free Day a 'huge success' 

Evening Standard
Sadiq Khan has given his strongest backing yet to a car-free day in London in a bid to cut deadly emissions from vehicles. The mayor called on every borough to get involved in this year's World Car Free Day on September 22 in order to make it a "huge success". Transport for London is working with more than 100 schools to encourage parents and carers to walk or cycle with their children for the day, while a series of other street events are also being planned. Speaking during Mayor's Question Time at City Hall, Mr Khan said: "Car-free events are great opportunities to inspire change by letting people experience the city from a different perspective. "I encourage boroughs to work with TfL to make this day a huge success and I've asked TfL to consider how we can do even more to support this in 2019." A petition calling on the mayor to ban private cars on September 22 has been signed by more than 10,000 people and 100 organisations, but Mr Khan has not suggested he will go that far yet. Sadiq Khan hopes car-free events will help cut emissions in the capital (AFP/Getty Images) One of the mayor's key transport aims is for 80 per cent of all trips to be made on foot, by cycle or by public transport by 2041. Air pollution in the capital has been linked to the premature deaths of thousands of Londoners every year. Labour's London Assembly spokesperson for the Environment, Leonie Cooper AM, said she was "delighted" to have the mayor's support for a car-free day in London. "Initiatives such as car-free days are absolutely integral to improving our capital's air quality," she said. "I'm delighted that the Mayor has backed calls for a car-free day in London in September - it will help Londoners start to see their local streets in a very different way, as they'll be safer and cleaner. "In London, we must all play a part in tackling air pollution, so I was pleased that the Mayor backed my call for all London boroughs to pledge to get involved in World Car Free Day this September. "It is also essential that schools and local organisations are fully engaged in the planning and promotion of car-free day activities, to ensure that the whole community reaps the rewards of the initiatives". World Car Free Day began in 2000, but similar events have been taking place in the UK since the 90s. Cities around the world, including Bogota, Jakarta, Paris and Brussels, have already successfully implemented the initiative. In Jakarta, it takes place on a weekly basis. Traffic has previously been banned from the capital during special events, such as the London Marathon. This proved highly effective in tackling London's toxic air as a section of the route saw an 89 per cent drop in pollution on race day. Research showed the air quality improved by almost nine tenths along Upper Thames Street as vehicles were barred from roads.... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 21:45:00 Categories: Evening Standard

Punta Tragara, Capri - hotel review 

Evening Standard
In the south of Italy is Naples, where in the old town spritz are a couple of euros and even the pizzerias are visited by Michelin. Eat, drink, then head to the dock: 40 minutes away on the ferry is Capri, the city's well-to-do cousin. It is merrily more expensive and an island of comforts, of which the hotel Punta Tragara is one of the best. It's a historic building, first built as a mansion for the family of an engineer, Emilio Errico Vismara. His longest-standing achievement, it is hardly like engineering at all; it seems, somehow, to have grown out of the rock it sits on. That it has 44 rooms is a surprise - the place is grand, but it is tranquil too. There are no crowds, no rushing. The place is casual about its gorgeousness and about its history. There's a nod to Churchill and Eisenhower, who used the place during the war and there's a little about its heyday when Count and Countess Manfredi - the grandparents of the current owner - would summer with cocktails and long swims, but that's it. This is old money modesty with all of its charms. Where is it? Capri, which isn't quite everything that is expected of it. It is monied, very monied - but, for much of the time, the flashiness is subdued. Capri retains its soul and the charm of southern Italy (the half that has more fun); the white buildings sit in the green shade of overgrown trees and all the house numbers are mosaics. What really lets on that place hums with cash is the condition of everything; there are no falling down buildings or runaway cracks, there is no flaking paint. There are no scraggly bushes and, come to that, no scraggly people. People on Capri don't have chapped lips or cracked nails. To get to the hotel wander down the main path from the main piazza, Umberto I. It sits at the end of it overlooking the famous Faraglioni. Get the right room and you'll gaze right out over these gorgeous cliffs. Tasteful: room are simple but elegant Style Italy has a reputation opulence but Capri is not, say, Venice - don't expect endless frescos and ornate detailing at the Tragara. Punta Tragara has an easy, Dickie Greenleaf charm. Super luxury? Certainly, and there's proof in the artwork dotted around and all the marble in the bathrooms, but rooms are light, tastefully simple, woken up with touches of colour; a chair the colour of Campari, a cushion as pink as prosciutto. In the daytime, they're breezy havens from the heat, though the balcony is where you'll want to spend the day, preferably with a bottle of fizz and a bucket of ice. The rooms that look out over the sea also catch the sunset. Which room? If money is no object, try the Art suite, where the bath, bed and huge terrace all overlook the Faraglioni. Still, everything here shimmers; calling the junior suites "junior" feels unfair, given their generous size. Try to ensure you nab a room with the sea view: there's not a hangover in the world that a glimpse of the endless blue can't cure. Just a swim away: the pool is handily close to the gin bar Facilities There are not one but two swimming pools, both which stare out over the sea, and both which are within a wave of the Monzu bar (handy, that). This bar is big on gin, and do plenty of classics, though expect lighter, summery serves at a steep price. If it's too early to drink - impossible on holiday? - there's also the gym and a four room spa. The breakfast room is beautifully done, too. Food & drink In the hotel itself is Monzù. Here, they do feasts, well mannered feasts; try delicate, gorgeous plates of pink lamb on tart fennel crumble, or suckling pork belly with warming almond puree. The tasting menu delivers course after course after course of rich Italian goodness; we ate a sumptuous, indulgent amount of food. Drink too. Wine started at first as a delicate consort but by the end was an intemperate, unruly partner in crime. But - woozy Italian nights are what life is for. The hotel has a sister restaurant, the Michelin starred Mammà, where the view seems endlessly distracting until the food comes. The restaurant is in a love affair with the sea; in clean, bright surroundings they plate up dish after dish of fresh fish, octopus, sea urchins, clams, the rest. On the walls are pictures of all the famous people that have eaten here over the years; some things never change. The place is a harbour of charm. Perfect view: the famous Faraglioli sit just beside the hotel Best For Escaping the world on a weekend - things don't feel entirely real here, which is a wonderful high. How to get there Capri doesn't have an airport so head over by ferry to the Marina Grande, where the smartly dressed staff from the hotel wait to collect bags. From there, it's 15 minutes: catch the cable car up to the Piazzetta (looking much the same as it did in It Started In Naples), wander through Via Caramelle then stick to Via Tragara. The walk is green and in theory short; it lengthens to gasping-for-a-G n' T lengths after the countless Instagram updates. When should I go? The pull of Capri is such that it entirely fills up with its shining crowds in July and August, when it is so busy that from the mainland you can practically hear the chatter of conversation and the tinkle of a thousand wine glasses tapping in cheers. It is bursting then, though still gorgeous. Alternatively, go in May or early June, or better yet, late in the season, September and October, when the days are still hot enough to laze in the pool and the nights go cool for long walks around the island. Details Rooms from ?521, Via Tragara, 57, 80073 Capri, Italy, hoteltragara.com... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 21:31:55 Categories: Evening Standard

Here's why you'll never have to worry about smashing your smartphone screen again 

Evening Standard
Is there anything worse than having to fork out £70+ to fix your smartphone screen? It feels even more painful when you could be paying up to £1,000 for your phone in the first place. Yet, these worries could be coming to an end. Corning, a US-based company that designs smartphone glass, has revealed a major breakthrough in glass technology with its new Gorilla Glass 6. The company's Gorilla Glass 5 is available in smartphones like the iPhone and Samsung's Galaxy S9, but Corning says the Glass 6 is its most durable cover glass to date. "Corning Gorilla Glass 6 improves upon Gorilla Glass 5 by surviving drops from higher heights, but, more importantly, has been engineered to survive multiple drops," said the Corning's Gorilla Glass VP and GM, John Bayne. Wave goodbye to smashed screens It's not easy to make smartphone glass that is virtually smash-proof. Read more '£1 billion repair bill' for people cracking mobile phone screens To achieve this, the new Glass 6 is made of an entirely new glass composition that can be chemically strengthened to give it very high levels of compression, making it more resistant to damage than the Glass 5, according to Corning Gorilla Glass's VP of technology and product development, Dr Jaymin Amin. Corning's team put the glass through several lab tests to ensure its durability. According to results, on average the Glass 6 survived 15 drops from one metre onto rough surfaces, up to two times better than the Glass 5. But, Gorilla Glass isn't just for the front of the smartphone. As manufacturers move towards glass backs, such as Samsung and Apple, any glass needs to be able to withstand drops from all angles. Read more This is the unbreakable phone case you need to protect your smartphone "In addition to addressing drop height and drop frequency, Gorilla Glass 6 was also developed to meet the requirements of modern designs that use glass for more than 85 per cent of the enclosure. "With both its aesthetic and performance advantages, glass is on the right side of the technology curve and will continue to be the material of choice for mobile consumer electronics," said Scott Forester, the division VP of marketing and innovation products. Sounds amazing right? The only problem is you need to wait for it. Corning says the Glass 6 is being tested by multiple customers and will reach the market in the next several months. Until then, you'll have to protect your phone in other ways, like with an unbreakable phone case.... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 21:15:18 Categories: Evening Standard

Franz Ferdinand star Alex Kapranos leads backlash over strict new licensing rules in Hackney 

Evening Standard
Franz Ferdinand star Alex Kapranos today led criticism of Hackney Council after it imposed strict new licensing laws on the borough's bars and nightspots. The new rules, passed on Wednesday night, will restrict venues in hipster areas including Dalston and Shoreditch from opening past 11pm on weeknights and midnight on weekends. But it sparked criticism from campaigners who say the new rules will "sterilise" the borough, and called on London's night czar Amy Lamé to step in. Following the decision, Franz Ferdinand singer Kapranos tweeted: "Very disappointed with proposals from @hackneycouncil to cripplingly restrict licensing hours and conditions. "It will rip the soul out of the area and is overwhelmingly opposed by local residents. Please reconsider." Dalston: Street Feast Former Rinse FM DJ Plastician added: "Awful news here once again. Hackney clamping down on future venues essentially making it pointless to open a night time establishment there. Must. Do. Better." Very disappointed with proposals from @hackneycouncil to cripplingly restrict licensing hours and conditions. It will rip the soul out of the area and is overwhelmingly opposed by local residents. Please reconsider. - alex kapranos (@alkapranos) July 18, 2018 Awful news here once again. Hackney clamping down on future venues essentially making it pointless to open a night time establishment there. @MayorofLondon@amylame Must. Do. Better. https://t.co/iugbWGGZLC - Plastician (@Plastician) July 19, 2018 Here is how Hackney residents responded to the Council's consultation on the proposed new policy. Overwhelmingly against. Completely ignored. pic.twitter.com/tsiwiBroeJ - Jonathan Downey (@DowneyJD) July 19, 2018 Jonathan Downey, founder of Street Feast and Hackney resident, said that he feels the result shows contempt for the residents and disregard for the view of local business-owners. "We now have the most restrictive licensing policy in the country a far as I am aware," he told the Standard. "I just don't understand why they would do this." Criticism: Franz Ferdinand's Alex Kapranos (Getty) He said he knows "100 times more" about Hackney licensing issues than most on the council but was not personally consulted. He said he and the campaign group We Love Hackney had been trying to contact the borough's mayor Philip Glanville "for months and months" but he did not engage with them until the night before. There are concerns the restrictive rules will drive out good venues "It was clear it was going to be steamrollered through. I think the residents know what is best for the residents - we are just being ignored." "I think there is some spitefulness about it - I think someone has thought f*** the residents and f*** 'We Love Hackney'." "This doesn't really affect me," he added. "I already have a 1000-capicity venue. But it is about younger people who should be coming in and competing with me, that is what makes Hackney an exciting place to be." David McDowall, of Brewdog, also expressed his disappointment at the decision, tweeting: "Passionate, determined campaign from @WeLoveHackney. Still in shock that overwhelming public opinion completely ignored. http://players.brightcove.net/1348423965/default_default/index.html?videoId=5715284832001 Hackney Wick artists' community building to be bulldozed as Olympic legacy chiefs make way for new bridge "We are a large operator these days no doubt, but firmly believe we must protect innovation and opportunity for new, independent and diverse operators." Read more Woman wins battle with Hackney Council over parking space gardens Leon co-founder Henry Dimbleby warned the move will turn "Hackney into Chelsea" and campaign spokesman Matthew Sanders believes the move will "sterilise" the borough. "I think Londoners will be incredulous that Hackney - of all places and with a worldwide reputation - has done this. They've introduced the toughest restrictions in Britain," he said. He added that the "real winners" would be areas such as Walthamstow, where businesses would migrate if they wanted to stay open later. "The reason Hackney became popular was because Westminster council did exactly the same thing to Soho 15 years ago - and everyone moved east," he added. But Hackney Council defended the move, saying current licensing rules are "out of date and need renewing". Councillor Emma Plouviez added: "Without these steps to manage our nightlife, we face a potential situation where the committee could be forced to approve late licences for venues that are completely unsuitable and will have a huge impact on residents' lives."... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 21:08:35 Categories: Evening Standard

Diplomatic moves: the power of dancing Obamas 

Evening Standard
Now that the Trumps have left us in peace we can focus on the Americans who really matter - Barack and Michelle Obama. They are on a summer tour of their own. It's the antidote to the presidential visit. Instead of leaving offended heads of state, petrol fumes from their fleet of Cadillacs and noise pollution from their helicopters in their wake, they are cheering us up. Londoners hotfooted it to Edinburgh to meet Michelle at a dinner for charity on Wednesday night and a video of Barack dancing in South Africa is being hailed on Twitter as what everyone should start the day watching. Here's how they are making friends around the world. Sasha, their youngest, dared mock the former president's "dad dancing". But that hasn't stopped Barack. Giving a speech with Nelson Mandela's widow Graça Machel in Johannesburg, he burst into an impromptu upper-body disco, rounded off with a nonchalant head-nod. It engaged his audience. Earlier in the week he got down in Kenya while opening a youth centre launched by his half-sister. It's his first visit to his father's homeland since he left office in January 2017 and he has been getting political, speaking out against leaders who don't believe in facts, co-operation or climate change. At a speech to mark what would have been Mandela's 100th birthday he said: "It used to be if you caught politicians lying, they said: 'Oh man'. Now they just keep on lying." Zing. Read more 6 books on Barack Obama's summer reading list His usual dance partner Michelle was giving him a run for his money. She started the week at Beyoncé and Jay-Z's On the Run II tour in Paris. Standing at the side of the stage with Beyoncé's mother Tina, she gave a masterclass in how to look cool at a concert in hoop earrings and white shorts. She was enjoying herself but not detracting from Bey, clapping at the right points and doing a spot of light booty-jiggling for Drunk in Love. These trips aren't just jollies. Michelle was in Edinburgh to raise money for the Kiltwalk charity, which donates to more than 1,000 good causes. She hosted a dinner where a table for 10 cost £5,000 - Judy Murray and Kirsty Wark were there. In her speech she reminded the audience that first ladies don't have to be passive show ponies, saying: "There's something wrong with us as women when we can be OK with mediocrity with men." Expect to hear more about her experience as First Lady in her autobiography, Becoming, out in November. She's also planning a return trip to Scotland, this time on holiday with Barack. Good news.... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 21:00:00 Categories: Evening Standard

Why America has stood tall while all around her burn 

Evening Standard
Two decades ago it was fashionable to predict a second "American century". Wall Street and Silicon Valley were both riding high. The US budget was in surplus and the US military appeared invincible. The American commentator, Charles Krauthammer, proclaimed a "unipolar moment". But "moment" turned out to be right. America's military and foreign policy elites were soon humiliated in Iraq. Its economic and financial elites were humiliated by the bust of 2008. The federal budget swung back into the red. And America's moral claim to global leadership was squandered by Donald Trump, who is neither moral, nor globally minded, nor a leader. Crashed is a bold attempt by Adam Tooze, a distinguished British-American historian, to make sense of this recent tumult. At the heart of his account lies a paradox: even though the financial crisis exposed the failings of the American economic model, its aftermath has underscored America's continuing economic pre-eminence. A self-described "Left-liberal", Tooze is not the sort to celebrate American capitalism gladly. This makes his verdict the more interesting. Read more 6 books on Barack Obama's summer reading list Part of the reason for American resilience lies in the speed of its response to the crisis. The Fed pumped trillions into the markets. Congress authorised money to recapitalise the banks. Emergency spending, tax breaks and further monetary gymnastics propped up the economy. Whereas the eurozone countries dithered over their crisis, with the result that unemployment in Greece, Spain and Italy is still more than 10 per cent, the US began its recovery almost immediately. But there is a deeper reason for America's continued power: the centrality of the dollar. Tooze skilfully reminds us how unexpected this was: amid the early rumblings of the crisis in late 2007 the dollar was dismissed as yesterday's currency. Warren Buffett was said to be dumping greenbacks. The supermodel Gisele Bündchen consented to endorse Procter & Gamble's Pantene brand on the condition that she would be paid in euros. But when the crisis really hit, a funny thing happened. Rather than running from the currency at the epicentre of the meltdown, global investors clamoured for it. From South Korean semiconductor manufacturers to German banks, everybody had borrowed in dollars, so when New York creditors demanded their money back, governments needed emergency consignments of dollars to prop up domestic institutions. The Federal Reserve supplied them via so-called "swap lines". In a very real sense, Uncle Sam saved the entire world economy. Just as English has remained the global language long after the demise of the empire, so the dollar is likely to remain the fulcrum of global finance indefinitely. Like language, money exhibits "network effects": companies borrow in dollars, so dollar markets are deep and efficient, so more companies choose to borrow in dollars. When the next crisis hits, the Federal Reserve will again be the world's indispensable institution. Whether this is comforting depends on what you make of Tooze's next suggestion. The way he tells it, Trump's election, and the rise of populists more generally, reflects justifiable outrage at the financial bailouts. As "a capitalist stabilisation effort", the bailouts were "remarkably successful", Tooze writes. But as a political project, they amounted to "scandalous government intervention to rescue private oligopolists". The election of an oligarch who poses as an anti-oligarch was the logical result. And since there is no sign that future bailouts will be structured differently, the implication is that more populists will be elected. If this is right, we are in trouble. But perhaps we should cheer up. There may well have been a connection between popular anger at Wall Street and Trump's election - Hillary Clinton did not help herself by accepting speaking fees from Wall Street. But the American system is capable of self-renewal. Even Barack Obama, often accused of doing too little to assuage the anger in the heartland, should be given credit for trying. Before 2008, he spoke out about the imperative of helping globalisation's losers, as Tooze notes. His tax policies and his health reform reduced inequality. The good thing about Crashed is that it allows for this possibility of American regeneration. Like any sophisticated history, it acknowledges that human agency matters; political and economic forces may shape context but outcomes are not predetermined. Human choices made the difference between the punitive Treaty of Versailles and the enlightened Marshall Plan, Tooze writes; they account for Herbert Hoover's disastrous response to the Great Depression and FDR's successful one. Trump himself is proof that individuals matter. Fortunately, he is an unusual specimen. Sebastian Mallaby is the author of The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan, winner of the 2016 FT/McKinsey Business Book of the Year prize. Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World by Adam Tooze (Allen Lane, £30), buy it here.... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 20:41:15

Our Friends in Berlin by Anthony Quinn - review: Love stalks the hunt for Nazis during the Blitz 

Evening Standard
There's a lot to be said for a wartime thriller right now, what with the hot weather and short concentration spans. So Anthony Quinn's latest comes at just the right time. The story revolves around a man called Jack who has no friends or family, and whose work as a fire warden during the Blitz belies his other activity, co-ordinating Nazi sympathisers across Britain - an unprepossessing, if ostensibly respectable, crew. His work throws him in the way of a young woman called Amy, the joint proprietor of a matchmaking agency in Mayfair, which brings her into contact with all sorts, including some unpleasant anti-Semites. She's also got a very odd schoolfriend, Marita, a curiously enigmatic but highly capable individual with no obvious means of support but pronounced anti-Jewish views. Just fancy, then, what happens when one of Amy's clients turns out to be a lady who works at the War Office and knows all about the Prime Minister's movements. A catch indeed. When Jack decides to sign up as one of Amy's clients, well, it's only a matter of time before the personal, the professional and the political get all tied up, sometimes at the National Gallery's wartime piano concerts. We're left, Hitchcock-style, with our hero and heroine pretending to be lovers in his flat, only for them. actually, let's leave it there. Read more My Year of Rest and Relaxation by Ottessa Moshfegh - review Quinn has the reputation for unexpected plot twists and dramatic denouements, and I am possibly the most gullible and easily scared reader any thriller writer could hope for, so it was unfortunate that I identified the under-the-radar villain quite so early; as for the really dangerous agent of Nazi Germany, no one could have seen him coming at all. The denouement then lacked the satisfaction of being a known character, while the reader finally gets cheated on the romantic aspect of the story. There's an interesting Northern Irish Protestant character of exemplary ruthlessness and devastating looks but, alas, he doesn't go far. I am a sucker for spy stories, detective fiction and thrillers - can I recommend Graham Greene's A Gun for Sale, while I've got you? But this one, while a perfectly good read with no obvious historical anachronisms, neither grips nor thrills quite enough. It's good to have on hand for the plane, though. Our Friends in Berlin by Anthony Quinn (Cape, £14.99), buy it here.... read more
 
19. heinäkuuta 2018 20:41:00
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